The AugmentSM Treatment

 

Screen Shot 2017-08-04 at 11.24.18 AM

 

What is the Augment Treatment?

Egg health is a key factor in fertility. While there are many factors that contribute to egg health, having adequate levels of energy inside of the egg is essential for fertilization and embryo development.¹

The Augment treatment uses the energy-producing mitochondria from a patient’s own EggPC cells-immaculate egg cells found in the protective lining of her ovaries-to supplement the existing mitochondria in her eggs. This process is designed to improve the health of a patient’s existing eggs, and enhance the IVF procedure. The Augment treatment has resulted in positive patient outcomes.²

Why would a patient need the Augment Treatment?

Your body is able to function thanks to hard-working mitochondria, which create the energy for your cells. The Augment treatment is based on multiple published reports that show adding mitochondria to an egg from a mitochondria-rich source, such as a donor egg, aids in embryo development.³

For the Augment treatment, we use energy-producing mitochondria from your own egg precursor (EggPC) cells to revitalize your eggs.

What can I expect from the Augment Treatment?

  • After your fertility doctor provides a small sample from the outer cortex of your ovary, the Augment treatment begins when the sample gets to a lab.
  • The tissue is processed to isolate mitochondria, the cell’s energy producers, from your EggPC cells.
  • Your fertility specialist combines the energy-producing mitochondria with the sperm, which are then added to your egg. The energy-producing mitochondria from your EggPC cells supplement your egg’s existing mitochondria during IVF.

The Augment Treatment Process

augment_process

 

For more information visit Augment Treatment

 

References

  1. S. Chappel. The Role of Mitochondria from Mature Oocyte to Viable Blastocyst. Obstetrics and Gynecology International. 2013:10. doi:101155/2013/183024
  2. OvaScience<sup>SM</sup> data on file.
  3. Studies published in peer-reviewed medical journals, including Molecular Human Reproduction (1998), Human Cell (2004), Electronic Journal of Biology (2005), Reproduction Research (2006), Human Reproduction (2001) and Reproductive Biomedicine (2011), involved a number of species, including humans, in which third-party scientists demonstrated that the addition of mitochondria to eggs increased cellular energy levels, egg quality and the likelihood of fertilization and healthy live births.